cupcake liner necklace

September 24, 2011 § 3 Comments

What can you do with a few cupcake liners and a couple feet of brass chain from the hardware store?  Why, make a necklace, of course!

This super easy, inexpensive, and surprising D-I-Y fashion craft is one I wanted to post over the summer before I got sidetracked by summer.  But it’s not too late!  So long as it’s not a rainy fall day, there is still lots of sunshine to be flaunting this fun, feminine, flirty necklace!

Yes!  It is what I wore in my D-I-Y engagement photos in August.  I wore it then with two flowers and wish now, in hindsight, that I wore three.

You will need cupcake liners (waxed is best), brass chain in your preferred length (they are typically around 45 cents per foot; for this project I used exactly 4 feet and paid $1.80), scissors, and ribbon.

1. Trim off about 1/8″ of one cupcake liner.

2. For each cupcake liner, trim off an additional 1/8″ than the previous size.  You will have cupcake liners that descend in size.  I suggest 5 for large flowers; smaller flowers can be made with 3 or 4 cupcake liners.

3. Stack all cupcake liners and align so that they are centered.  Fold the stack in half, with all cupcake liners facing out.  Cut two very small slits, about 1/2″ apart, ensuring the slits are just wide enough to carefully slide the chain through.  Large cuts will cause the flowers to loosely slide along the chain.

4. Carefully slide the chain through one slit of each cupcake liner, starting from largest to smallest.  It is best to keep the cupcake liners 1/2″ to 1″ apart at this stage.

5. Slide the chain through the second slit of each cupcake liner, similar to sewing a two-holed button.  Gather the cupcake liners to form a stack.

6. Fold the stack in half.

7. Pinch and fold towards the center.

8. Unfold to reveal a flower.

9. Layer as many flowers and chains as you please.

10. Thread a ribbon through the ends of the chain.

11. Tie a bow to close the chain(s).

Flaunt it.  Feel fun, feminine, and flirty!

 

floral stamped clay bangles

December 14, 2010 § 37 Comments

There’s still time to make handmade holiday gifts!

These floral stamped bangles were inspired by an old, forgotten object in the kitchen: an outdated glass plate with rose embellishments.  I have always marveled at the embossed pattern on the bottoms of glass plates and was stricken with the idea of using them as stamps on polymer clay.  After a celebrated return in fashion, there’s no better time to wear floral accessories.

I admit, I had moments of contention with this project.   After a shattered first attempt and a frenzied call to my good friend and polymer clay expert, Karen at Subtle Details, I learned the medium is too brittle to form into a bangle without applying it on some type of reinforcement.  Given the purpose, the reinforcement has to be metal to withstand the clay’s baking process, as well as provide strength and durability to the final product.  I mulled it over for some time before it occurred to me — cookie cutters — they’re metal, already round, and require no further shaping or cutting.  What may be the shortcoming of the cookie cutter is its predetermined size.  I was restricted to the thickness of the cookie cutter and wish for a much wider bangle to showcase more of the rose pattern I’ve come to love.  And even with my bird bones, I could use a diameter that’s about 1/4″ wider (I used 2-1/2″).

To make this project you will need:

a. Oven-baked polymer clay in your choice of colors.

b. An embossed glass plate or any object embossed with a deep relief.

c. Cookie cutters, 3″ or 4″ in diameter.

d. I have not invested in any clay glazes and thought it was a great opportunity to use up some nail polishes, as they never seem to run out.  Use a color that is a close match to the clay, but not lighter than.  You can leave the clay as it is, but I felt it needed a glaze to finish it off. *Edit: Elaine commented below that not all polymer clays can be glazed with nail polish.  Please try on a sample piece before applying on your project.  Thanks for the tip, Elaine!*

e. 7/8″ ribbon.

1. Condition the clay and roll out about 1/8″ thick, making sure the strip is long enough to cover the whole perimeter of the cookie cutter.  Stamp the pattern on the flattened clay.

2. Using a knife or a pizza cutter, cut the clay with an extra 1/4″ on each side of the cookie cutter.

3. Roll the clay on the cookie cutter.  Carefully trim and merge the seams.

4. Fold and flatten the edges onto the inner side of the cookie cutter.  Bake according to clay’s package instructions.  Let cool.

5. Glaze and let dry.  Using super glue or heavy duty double-sided tape, adhere the ribbon along the inner side of the cookie cutter.

This post is participating in Today’s Creative Blog:

paperclip statement necklace

December 7, 2010 § 10 Comments

I’ve had a pewter-gray jumpsuit stashed away in my closet, in want of a statement accessory.  My parents’ early Christmas party this weekend was the ideal occasion to don the outfit and motivation to make my own crafty diva-on-a-dime jewelry.  I decided on making a statement necklace out of less than $2 worth of paper clips from the dollar store and some leather string I’ve had stored in my craft drawer for years.  Quite timely, my old leather string is a very current, trendy shade of burgundy (wines are making quite a reappearance in the fashion scene, as is every trend from the nineties). 

So there I am, striking a no-nonsense pose in front of my parents’ beautifully adorned tree, boldly wearing my homemade necklace, which no one seemed to guess was fashioned out of paperclips until I pointed it out. 

You will need 280 paperclips and 3 strings or chains of your choice material, each being 2″ shorter than the next.  If you are not using chains with clasps and opting for strings, as I have, make sure they are cut 1″ longer than the preferred final length. 

1. Thread 50 paperclips through your string.  Throughout the project, make sure to thread through the end of the paperclip that has the smaller hole.  This prevents the paperclips from being misaligned.

2. Arrange your strings into tiers.  Use the shortest as a top string,  then a middle string, and the longest being a bottom string.  Thread 30 paperclips through both the upper and middle strings.  The 50 paperclips threaded in step 1 will be the bottom-most tier.

3. On the left side, alternate threading paperclips through the top and middle strings, one at a time, until each tier has 10 paperclips.  Repeat on the right side.

4. On the left side, thread 20 paperclips through both the middle and bottom strings.  Repeat on the right side.

5.  On the left side, thread 20 paperclips through both the top and middle strings.  Repeat on the right side.

6. On the left side, thread 10 paperclips through both the middle and bottom strings.  Repeat on the right side.

7. On the left side, thread 10 paperclips through the top and middle strings.  Repeat on the right side.

8. Tie the strings together in a knot.

 Of course, there are endless patterns to create using as many tiers as preferred.  There is a wide variety of strings and chains to use, as well as different lengths.  I think I’m ready to start a daring paperclip jewelry collection just for fun!

Where Am I?

You are currently browsing entries tagged with diy jewelry at paper, plate, and plane.

%d bloggers like this: